Was Christianity as Violent as Islam?

The topic of “The Crusades” inevitably comes up when speaking about the violence of Islam. I will be the first to agree that murder is horrible, and murder with a cross and a shield is perhaps even worse. I would submit to you that as a Christian, our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places (Eph 6:12). We are not called to harm people in the name of Christ, but to show kindness, love and forgiveness.

There were a series of nine crusades that lasted from the 10th through the 12th centuries. They were bloody and deadly. It has been estimated that close to 1.7 million people died as a result of armies attempting to reclaim the holy lands. The question that needs asked is: Were the actions and intents of the Crusaders similar to the actions and intents of the Muslims that then controlled Palestine?

I will agree that both the Christian and Muslim armies attempted to gain land, but the Crusades were a response to the relentless attacks of the Muslim armies as they pushed their kingdom further and further across the Mediterranean into Europe. The heart of the Crusades was to repel the advance of Islam, and by slapping the Christian idea of reclaiming the Holy Lands to the action many gladly jumped on board.

Another huge difference between the two forces is that the Byzantine Empire was a military force that used religion to unite individuals. After the embrace of Christianity by Constantine, people had something in common to hold them together. Islam was a religion that became militarized. The purpose of Islam is and has always been to conquer. “Fighting is prescribed upon you, and ye dislike it. But it is possible that ye dislike a thing which is good for you, and that ye love a thing which is bad for you. But Allah knoweth, and ye know not.” (Quran 2:216).

It is he (Allah) who has sent his Messenger (saw) with guidance and the religion of truth, in order for it to be dominant over all other religions, even though the Mushrikoon (disbelievers) hate it.” (EMQ at-Tawbah, 9: 33)

By the end of the first millennia after the death of Christ, Islam had exploded. The Sinai Peninsula wasn’t able to contain this fledgling religion and it spilled out all across the Middle East, but that’s not where it stayed.

By 680 AD what is now Northern Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Omen, Yemen and Palestine had all been touched by the arms of Islam. By 740 AD, half of Turkey, the southern tip of Russia, the northern sliver of Africa and Iran had also been reached. Once most of the Middle East was under Islamic control, the next natural extension of the Islamic arm was throughout regions surrounding the Mediterranean. By 820 AD, Spain, France and parts of Italy were fighting against a new type of war—the Jihad.

When you look at the nine reactionary Crusades made by the Christianized Byzantines they pale in comparison to the close to 550 Islamic battles.  Link to Bill Warner’s Youtube video of below image.

Another component that drove the Byzantines to the crusades was the slave raiding made by the Muslims armies. “What Islam did bring to Europe was war and slavery, on a massive scale. The House of Islam in the tenth century had little use for any of the produce and natural resources of Europe, except one; the bodies of the Europeans themselves. Young women and boys were preferred, but during the tenth century Europeans of almost any age or class, and in almost any part of the continent, could find themselves in chains and on a ship bound for North Africa or the Middle East.” – The Impact of Islam, BY Emmet Scott.

In summary, I would say Christianity at it’s heart is non-violent. Jesus implores us to show love.  Even when we consider the violent stories in the Bible, they are just stories of the past, and not mandates for our future. The violent verses in the Quran however are not stories from the past, but instructions to the Muslim. I want to be clear, there are many Muslims that are not violent, Muslims that have been taught to interpret the Quran in a non-violent way. But while Muslims may choose to be non-violent, the Quran teaches violence.

Is the 70th week upon us?

The number seven appears many times in the Bible. We see it in the very beginning of God’s word when He blessed the 7th day in Genesis 2:2 and made it a day of rest. We see many patterns of seven in Revelation, the final book of the Bible, where seven seals, seven trumpets and seven bowls are used to bring God’s final judgements to the nations. Joshua used it as he marched around Jericho. Jesus mentioned it when talking about forgiving others. Elisha spoke of it when offering healing to Naaman. It is used 735 times in the Bible. The theme of sevens is spread all throughout the holy writings. Seven in the Bible demonstrates perfection and completion(Tweet This).

… seven priests shall carry seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark; then on the seventh day you shall march around the city seven times, and the priests shall blow the trumpets – Joshua 6:4.

Seventy is also a number that shows up often in the bible. Ancient Israel had 70 elders appointed by Moses to help lead the nation (Numbers 11:16). The Israelites spent a total of 70 years in captivity to Babylon and the prophecy of Daniel 9 in particular mentions 70 weeks (of years) to take place after Daniel:

“Seventy weeks have been decreed for your people and your holy city, to finish the transgression, to make an end of sin, to make atonement for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the most holy place. So you are to know and discern that from the issuing of a decree to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until Messiah the Prince there will be seven weeks and sixty-two weeks; it will be built again, with plaza and moat, even in times of distress. Then after the sixty-two weeks the Messiah will be cut off and have nothing, and the people of the prince who is to come will destroy the city and the sanctuary. And its end will come with a flood; even to the end there will be war; desolations are determined. And he will make a firm covenant with the many for one week, but in the middle of the week he will put a stop to sacrifice and grain offering; and on the wing of abominations will come one who makes desolate, even until a complete destruction, one that is decreed, is poured out on the one who makes desolate.” – Daniel 9:24-27

Many prophecy teachers today would agree that 69 of these weeks have already passed (Tweet This), and the remaining week (7 years) is to happen in the future.  The big question is when.

There’s an interesting collision of the number 70 in the news headlines today. On Nov. 29, 1947, the United Nations General Assembly passed a resolution calling for Palestine to be partitioned between Arabs and Jews, allowing for the formation of the Jewish state of Israel. On January 2017, 70 years later, 70 nations will gather in Paris to decide the state of the Jewish nation (Tweet This). Could this be the start of the 70th week of Daniel? Who knows, but I find it troubling that it falls at the end of a US presidency that has shown to act against the Nation of Israel—and particularly by obtaining to vote to protect them in a recent UN resolution. It’s also troubling that this 2017 meeting will take place on President Obama’s watch, just a few days before the inauguration of President Elect Donald Trump.

The prophecies of the second coming of the Messiah predict a very hard time for the nation of Israel. It’s going to get a lot harder for Israel before it gets easier. Jeremiah 30 says, “Alas! for that day is great, There is none like it; And it is the time of Jacob’s distress, But he will be saved from it.” I don’t believe we are in that time yet, but it may soon be upon us. The actions of our current president may have started the ball to rolling.

Where does evil come from?

Sin has been with us since the beginning. We see the first sign of evil when Cain kills his brother Able out of jealousy.  The Bible also tells us that this pre-flood world was full of all kinds of evil, but where did it come from. This article will share some thoughts about three root categories of sin and the cause of evil in the world today.  I’ve made great progress on my book Seven times Understanding the Times, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and God’s Ultimate Plan for the world, and hope to release it in 2017, but the purpose of this work is to look at God’s big picture. As part of my study, I began digging into the issue of sin and man’s fallen state, and in particular 1 John 2 listed below. To see the big picture, we must understand sin and how it affects our world (Tweet That!). 1 John 2 suggests that all of our short comings can fall into 3 main areas. I will briefly mention the first and the last from this Biblical list, but the one that I really want to look at the lust of the eyes because I believe it relates to the source of evil.

 

1 John 2:15-17Do not love the world nor the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the boastful pride of life, is not from the Father, but is from the world. The world is passing away, and also its lusts; but the one who does the will of God lives forever.”

1 Timothy 6:10 “For the love of money is the root of all evil.”

 

The Lust of the Flesh

The first one mentioned in this list, “lust of the flesh” can be broken down into the physical drives that the body has. Understand that these drives are not wrong, but can be if used in ways that are harmful. God gave us all of our drives to help us live fulfilled lives; they are good when used within the boundaries set by God.

  • Thirst & Breath – are drives we have that don’t really have any (sin issue) associated with them.
  • Sleep & Hunger – can be associated with the sin of laziness. Resting and taking it easy are not necessarily wrong, but the bible suggests a lifestyle of laziness will lead to ruin. I don’t believe overeating is a sin, but I do believe gluttony is really associated with laziness.
  • Addictive substances – things like alcohol, caffeine, tobacco, etc. are all things that can lead to addiction. I don’t want to debate whether these are right or wrong, but I do think a strong biblical case for their use in moderation can be built.  Paul mentions, “all things are lawful, but I will not be mastered by any.”
  • Sex – sexual activity practiced outside of God’s defined marriage bed (lust, adultery, promiscuity, pornography, etc. ) are harmful (sinful) activities.

 

The Root Issue: Being controlled by our physical drives can cause us to act below where God created us to be (Tweet That!). God created all animals with drives, but he created humans in His own image. We are above animals, and should not be driven like animals. Rather we are to control our drives, and not let them control us.

The Biblical Solution: Fasting. Regular fasting of food, sex, entertainment and other things our body craves will help us keep these drives in check. Daily disciplines. Forming daily habits of reading our Bibles and praying can also help us over come these drives. When we learn to tell ourselves “no” and do what we want to do vs what we crave – then we win.

 

The Pride of Life

The third item in the list deals with pride. There is nothing wrong with feeling good about a job well done.  A nicely mown lawn, a clean house and a great job on a project are all good things. I believe God intended us to gain pleasure from our work. That said, pride can take us to a place we don’t want to go. Biblical, this is why Satan fell, because he desired to be on the same level as God. If we begin to change our behavior to gain praise or approval of others, pride probably has a hold of us.

 

The Root Issue: It causes us to act above where God created us to be. God created us perfect, but mankind fell. We must understand that we are utterly lost and that it is in Christ alone that we are raised up by God.

The Biblical Solution: Helping others in secret. To keep us from being approval seekers, we should often do acts of kindness and charity without receiving credit for it.  Allow others to receive credit and/or do those good works in secret.

 

The Lust of the Eyes (The one I wanted to really talk about)

If the lust of the flesh is equated with the desires of the physical body, then the lust of the eyes could be associated with the desires of our soul.  Money, possessions, sparkly things! I don’t think being wealthy is a sin. The Bible called Abraham very rich, and Job’s net worth was about 5.3 million (in today’s terms) just counting his livestock.  Some have even said that money is the root of all evil, but that is incorrect.  It is the love of money that is harmful.

I personally think the American dream can become the American nightmare. If we allow life to become all about what we can gain, then we’ve missed it. It’s OK to possess things, just don’t let them possess you.

 

The Root Issue: We are not satisfied with what God has given us. Many search for something to fill an empty hole in their life, but “things” cannot fill that hole. I believe it can only be filled with a relationship with Christ.

The Biblical Solution: Give things away. To keep from being consumed by material things, give stuff away.

I said all that to say this.  Biblical, evil is treating others in a harmful and malicious way, and according to the Bible all evil is attributed to the sin of greed (desire for money or possessions)–the lust of the eyes.  If we do what’s within our power to encourage and teach people to become giving individuals, then I believe evil will be reduced.

Do I think we can fix this world? Nope. If you’ve read much of the Bible, you understand that life in the end-times will be plagued with evil, but that should not prevent us from living our best. I’ll now answer the question of this article: Where does evil come from? It comes from people who value things above others. It comes from inside us. Cain killed his brother because Able possessed something that Cain did not have. Do not allow the drive for “things” cause you to treat others poorly.

As a pastor, I try to teach these three principles to everyone I know. They are biblical and they work. They will change your life.

  1. Learn to tell yourself no. Fasting will help you become a stronger person.
  2. Value giving to others more than receiving from others. It is more blessed to give than receive.
  3. Do good deeds in secret. Taking no credit or allowing others to take the credit for your work will help you become a humble person.

Talmud Records Strange Events after Death of Jesus

talmud02The Talmud is a collection of instructions that form a central text in Rabbinic Judaism. There are actually two versions, the Babylonian Talmud was created by Babylonian Jews and is widely accepted as authoritative. A second, Jerusalem Talmud exists, but it’s not generally taught or accepted.

There are several interesting events written in the Babylonian Talmud that occurred between AD 30 and the destruction of the temple in AD 70.

Yoma 39b:

Our Rabbis taught: During the last forty years before the destruction of the Temple the lot [‘For the Lord’] did not come up in the right hand; nor did the crimson-coloured strap become white; nor did the westernmost light shine; and the doors of the Hekal would open by themselves, until R. Johanan b. Zakkai rebuked them, saying: Hekal, Hekal, why wilt thou be the alarmer thyself? I know about thee that thou wilt be destroyed, for Zechariah ben Ido has already prophesied concerning thee: Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.

 

It would seem that up until the temple was destroyed, 40 years after the death of Jesus, that four strange things commonly happened:

  • The Lot for the Lord was not correct. This was a bit like rolling dice. The priest would cast the lots and take up two, one in the left hand and one in the right. If the lot for the Lord was in the right hand then all of Israel was joyful, but if it came up in the left they were not. It seems God was not happy that Israel rejected Jesus.
  • The strip was not white. The strip was a piece of cloth tied to the Azazel goat, with a portion of the red cloth tied to the Temple door. Each year the cloth would turn white and signify the atonement of Yom Kippur was acceptable to the Lord. This annual event happened until AD 30 when the cloth would no longer turn white. Jesus is now the only acceptable sacrifice God will accept.
  • The light did not shine. The seven candle-stick Menorah in the Temple went out and would not shine for 40 years. For 12,500 nights in a row this lamp would not stay lit.
  • The doors would open themselves.  The Temple doors would swing open every night of their own accord.  This also happened for the 40 years following the crucifixion of Jesus.

I don’t place the same measure of authority on the Talmud as I do the scriptures, but these historical records are interesting. I’ll leave it up to you to study these events in more depth, but the point is the Jewish leadership of the day recognized something was amiss between 30 AD and 70 AD.

What was amiss? The fact that the Jewish people missed their Messiah. They were looking for a Messiah that would deliver them from the oppression of Rome.  He would build an everlasting temple and usher in an era of peace. They failed to recognize the verses Jesus fulfilled in his first coming. These prophecies spoke of his being mocked (Psalm 22:7). They spoke of his hands and feet being pierced (Psalms 22:16). He would be rejected by men (Isaiah 53:3). He would be a rock of offence for both houses of Israel (Isaiah 8:14).

Romans 11 tells us that one day Israel will return to God Rom 11:25,26 “For I do not want you, brethren, to be uninformed of this mystery—so that you will not be wise in your own estimation—that a partial hardening has happened to Israel until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in; and so all Israel will be saved;

Glossary of Common Islamic Terms

Glossary Dictionary Definitione single word close up

Glossary of Common Islamic Terms

As I’m working my way through Seven Times: Understanding the Times, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and God’s Ultimate Plan for the world I’m compiling a list of commonly used Islamic terms. I’ll try and add to this list as my work continues.  If you think a term should be added, please fee free to contact me on my Facebook Page.

Items like * Al-Qaeda, with the star and colored red are Islamic terrorists groups.

 

* Abu Sayyaf – is an Islamic Sunni militant group based in and around the islands of southwestern Philippines.

* Al-Qaeda – is a broad based Islamic Sunni militant group founded by Osama bin Laden and a few others.

* Al-Shabaab – is a jihadist terrorist group based in East Africa and in 2012, it pledged allegiance to the militant Islamist organization Al-Qaeda.

Allah – is the Islamic term for god. While the concept is the same as the Christian God, the personalities of each are different.

Allah Akbar – the phrase means Allah is most great. Used when recognizing an individual or event. Many terrorists have been heard quoting the phrase before committing acts of violence.

Ayatollah – Is a title given to a spiritual leader among the Shia.

Caliph – a successor to Muhammad.

Dajjal – The Islamic Antichrist.

Hadith – A collection of Muhammad’s sayings, deeds or traditions. They are taught as Islamic theology and are second below the Quran and are used to interpret the Quran.

Hajj – Pilgrimage to Mecca during the twelfth month of the Muslim calendar.

Hijra – The flight of Muhammad from Mecca to Medina in AD 622.

Hejab – A veil that covers the head and sometimes chest and body of Muslim women beyond the age of puberty and worn in the presence of adult males outside of their immediate family.

* Hezbollah – Shia Islamist militant group and political party based mostly in Lebanon.

Imam – A religious leader or head of local community.

Jihad – A struggle or effort in the cause of Allah. It can refer to an inner struggle or actual war to protect the interest of Islam.

Kafir – A person who refuses to submit to Islam.

Kufi – A hat sometimes worn by Muslim men.

Mahdi – The term means guided one. It’s also the term for Islamic Messiah. The person Islam claims will return in the last days and lead the Muslims.

Muhammad – Is a prophet in Islam and lived between AD 570 and AD 632.

Murtad – A Muslim that has converted to another religion.

Quran – This is Islam’s most sacred book. Claimed to have been written by Muhammad under inspiration of the angel Gabriel.

Ramadan – Month of fasting for Muslims and occurs in the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. It is believed when Muhammad started receiving Quranic revelations.

Shariah – A term for Islamic Law based upon the Quran, Hadith and Sunnah.

Sunnah – Verbally transmitted deeds, sayings and teachings of Muhammad.

Shia (Shi’ite) – a Muslim believer that thinks the leadership should follow from Muhammad’s line.

Sunni – Make up about 90% of all Muslims. Unlike Shia they believe leaders do not have to be descendants of Muhammad.

Takfiri – Is a Sunni Muslim who claims another Muslim or person of another Abrahamic faith apostasy.

* Taliban – A group of fundamentalist Islamic Sunni militants mostly found in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Are the Old Testament Laws still important?

ThOld_Bibles-1e entire Bible is the revelation of God himself to mankind. It’s tells us what God is like and it’s the story of the creation of man, his fall, his need of God, and God saving him. God didn’t give us the entire Bible all at once, but as mankind grew He revealed more and more about Himself to us—ending with a new covenant (the New Testament).  As we look at the Old Testament we need to approach it in different ways based upon what style of writing the book contains. We don’t read a math book in the same way we read Shakespeare and we don’t read Isaiah in the same way we read Genesis. Below is a quick summary of the Old Testament.

Bible Facts:

  • 66 different books (39 in the Old and 27 in the New Testament)
  • About 40 authors
  • It covers a time span of 1600 years
  • Written in three different languages (Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic)
  • Top five bible writers by number of chapters (Moses, Ezra, Paul, David, Isaiah)

Categories of the Old Testament

Law—You should read books of the Law with understanding that God gave the laws to the Israelites (and us) to help them survive and to help them as they worshiped God. There are various categories of “Law” and some of these laws changed as Israel grew.

One type of law that we can trace from the beginning of creation until the return of Christ are the dietary laws. In the Garden of Eden God told Adam and Eve, “”I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.” After the flood God told Noah that he could eat any animal, except for the blood of the animal.  Several hundreds of years later when Moses came down from the mountain, God gave many restrictive laws concerning food. Things like pork and other animals that chewed the cud were forbidden.  In the New Testament God told Peter that we now have freedom to eat all animals. It’s important to understand the type of Law when trying to judge if it applies to us under the new covenant.

  • Ceremonial and dietary Laws (examples: Don’t eat pork, Make sacrifices using a lamb, bull, etc). These laws were done away with in the New Testament. Jesus was the final sacrifice and we no longer need to offer animals to God. The death of Jesus covered all sins for all times, and it’s just up to you to accept the sacrifice on your behalf. As mentioned before, the dietary laws have changed over time and we are now free to eat any animals.
  • Moral Laws (Lies, sexuality, theft, etc). These laws still stand today and Jesus taught they were wrong. Jesus also took a stronger stance on many of the moral laws. For example, Jesus said that lusting after a woman is just like adultery.  He also said that hating a person is murder in your heart. The moral laws come in three flavors: lust of the eyes, lust of the flesh and the pride of life.
    • Lust of the flesh is perhaps the most well known and deals with desires of our physical body. These include any sexual deviance (sex between unmarried people, adultery, homosexuality, bestiality, and lust). They also include addictions of all types.
    • Lust of the eye is similar to the flesh except it is a desire for what you see.  The pursuit of money and possessions above our pursuit of God is sinful. These include things like theft and envy.
    • The pride of life can also be an unhealthy drive. It’s the desire for others to like us and praise us. It’s why Satan fell.  Satan tempted Jesus with this when he said, If’ you’re really the Son of God then jump, won’t He save you? People will go to great lengths to gain the approval of others.
  • Civil laws (examples: don’t harvest the edges of the field, observe the Sabbath, Observe the other Jewish holidays). These laws were in place to help the nation of Israel to govern itself.  They may still be a good idea, but they are not law to us, they were law to the nation of Israel.

History—you should read history books as a list of factual events that happened. Most of the time the events are in chronological order, but they are intended to described what happened. Some examples of history in the Old Testament are 1 & 2 Chronicles, Genesis, 1 & 2 Kings, etc.

Poetry & Wisdom—you should read these books understanding that they express the emotions and feelings of mankind. When you read these you’ll relate with many of the writers and how they felt, and they often give us great advice. Examples: Psalms, Proverbs, etc.

Major Prophets—prophets  were often used imagery to explain what they saw.  For example: In the book of Daniel, he interpreted a dream of a large statue of with a head of gold, a chest of silver, a belly of bronze, and legs of iron.  It turned out that this statue represented actual kingdoms that existed (Medes, Persians, Greeks, and Roman empires). Some other major prophets were: Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel.

Minor Prophets—they were not minor because they are less important, but just because their books are generally smaller.  We should read these just as we read the Major Prophets.  Their message is just as “prophetic” Examples : Hosea, Joel, Amos, etc.

Old Testament Book Categories

  • The Book of Beginnings, History
    • Genesis
  • Law
    • Exodus
    • Leviticus
    • Numbers
    • Deuteronomy
  • National History of Israel
    • Joshua
    • Judges
    • Ruth
    • 1 & 2 Samuel
    • 1 & 2 Kings
    • 1 & 2 Chronicles
    • Ezra
    • Nehemiah
    • Esther
  • Poetry & Wisdom
    • Job
    • Psalms
    • Proverbs
    • Ecclesiastes
    • Song of Solomon
  • Major Prophets
    • Isiah
    • Jeremiah
    • Lamentations
    • Ezekiel
    • Daniel
  • Minor Prophets
    • Hosea
    • Joel
    • Amos Obadiah
    • Jonah
    • Micah
    • Nahum
    • Habakuk
    • Zephaniah
    • Haggai
    • Zechariah
    • Malachi

Aproximate dates of the Books of the Bible

  • Job—Thought to be the oldest book in the bible.
  • Genesis–1445-1405 B.C.
  • Exodus –1445-1405 B.C.
  • Leviticus –1445-1405 B.C.
  • Numbers–1445-1405 B.C.
  • Deuteronomy–1445-1405 B.C.
  • Psalms–1410-450 B.C.
  • Joshua–1405-1385 B.C.
  • Judges–ca. 1043 B.C.
  • Ruth–ca. 1030-1010 B.C.
  • Song of Solomon–971-965 B.C.
  • Proverbs–ca. 971-686 B.C.
  • Ecclesiastes–940-931 B.C.
  • 1 Samuel–931-722 B.C.
  • 2 Samuel–931-722 B.C.
  • Obadiah–850-840 B.C.
  • Joel–835-796 B.C.
  • Jonah–ca. 775 B.C.
  • Amos–ca. 750 B.C.
  • Hosea–750-710 B.C.
  • Micah–735-710 B.C.
  • Isaiah–700-681 B.C.
  • Nahum–ca. 650 B.C.
  • Zephaniah–635-625 B.C.
  • Habakkuk–615-605 B.C.
  • Ezekiel–590-570 B.C.
  • Lamentations–586 B.C.
  • Jeremiah–586-570 B.C.
  • 1 Kings–561-538 B.C.
  • 2 Kings–561-538 B.C.
  • Daniel 536-530 B.C.
  • Haggai–ca. 520 B.C.
  • Zechariah–480-470 B.C.
  • Ezra–457-444 B.C.
  • 1 Chronicles–450-430 B.C.
  • 2 Chronicles–450-430 B.C.
  • Esther–450-331 B.C.
  • Malachi–433-424 B.C.
  • Nehemiah–424-400 B.C.

Lose The Notes – Revolutionize Your Public Speaking

CaptureWhen I first started public speaking, I used a stack of typed notes and read them aloud to the audience. I had the basics down, a well studied topic, highlighted sentences where more emphasis was needed, and an occasional pause with eye contact with the audience. It worked fairly well and over time I improved, but I still felt like my speaking lacked something. One week I picked up a book about speaking without notes. My very next speech was phenomenal. The audience was engaged and I was dripping with confidence. I received all kinds of compliments after that message and I never went back to a typed manuscript.

The preparation for speaking without notes is not that different than speaking with them. In both cases you start with studying a topic and creating an outline, but the last steps for each is different. With a speech with notes you would spend some time writing the document, careful to word things just right. You would then read it out-loud several times to check for errors. You could then highlight some important points if you like. Then it’s ready for delivery.

The next step for noteless speaking is to organize your outline on note-cards, with each card representing a point of the message. The last step is memorization. I know what you’re thinking, but you too can engage your audience through memorization (Tweet That!). It just takes time and repetition. The benefits of noteless speaking are amazing.

The first benefit is it allows you to more effectively engage the audience. When you don’t have to refer to notes it allows you constant eye-contact with your audience. People feel like you are speaking directly to them. If feels more like a conversation than a speech. You’ll gain the freedom to leave the platform and walk among those gathered to hear you.

A second benefit is you can more effectively use body language to get your message across. It has been said that only seven percent of communication is verbal and the other 93 percent is non-verbal. There is so much more to your speech than words. Let your audience feel your message through your expressions. Be animated in what you say. Smile, laugh, walk around, jump or lie down, but the more energy you pour into your speaking, the more the audience will receive.

Speaking without notes also forces you to know your topic well. I’m not talking about preparation of your topic but a familiarity with it. As you work to commit your information to memory you start to understand it well. It takes me about two hours to memorize a 40 minute speech outline. During that two hours I probably go over the material 20-30 times. when you get it into your spirit, you’re not so consumed with saying the exact words correctly, but it becomes something alive within you. The heart of the message will flow through you when you speak it.

Knowing a topic well brings confidence and confidence will be noticed by the audience. Speaking to an audience is a privilege and they deserve your best, so whether you speak with or without notes, always take the time to research, organize and familiarize yourself with your topic. Find something you can be passionate about and speak it from your heart.

Follower’s of Islam Still Perform Animal Sacrifice

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In a little more than a month, on September 12th-13th of this year (2016), many Muslims around the world will sacrifice livestock in one of their most sacred festivals. Animals such as sheep, goats, cows and camels will forfeit their lives in Muslim sacrifice (Tweet That!) in commemoration of Allah’s mercy and Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son Ishmael. Does that story sound familiar? If so, you may recognize the same story in the Hebrew Bible, except God had asked Abraham to sacrifice his son Issac. The story is about a man who was asked to sacrifice his son and offer him to God Almighty. In both stories, God stopped the sacrifice before it happened and provided an animal in the son’s place. It was a test of Abraham’s faith. You may ask, what’s the big deal. Does it really matter which of Abraham’s sons was involved? The answer is yes.

For the Muslim it’s a story about faith and obedience. Muhammad, is reported to have said, “It is a tradition that has come down to us from Abraham.” The sacrifices take place on Eid al-Adha, and it marks the climax of Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca. The sacrifice is not for the forgiveness of sins. For the “small sins” the Muslim can be forgiven by doing good deeds like extra prayer and fasting. For the “big sins” a Muslim must repent to Allah, and Allah will decide whether or not to forgive. They will find out on Judgement Day if they have been forgiven. It is through Allah’s choice and works that the Muslim is saved (Tweet That!).

For the Jew, the sacrifice first seen at Mount Moriah with Abraham was expanded when God gave Moses the 10 commandments and the rest of the Law. The idea of animal sacrifice started with Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. When they sinned, God had to kill the first animal to cover their nakedness. We see also that Adam’s son Abel also offered a sacrifice that was pleasing to the Lord. The sacrificial Law given to Moses had five types of offerings to the God:

  1. The Burnt Offering [sheep, goats, turtle dove, pigeon] was a voluntary sacrifice that signified total surrender to God.
  2. The Grain Offering [meat, baked goods, flour, salt] was voluntary and signified a living sacrifice to God.
  3. The Peace Offering [cattle, lamb, goat] was voluntary and signified fellowship and was eaten with the priest.
  4. The Sin Offering [Bull, goat] was a required sacrifice meant for unintentional sins. Dealt more with the nature of mankind.
  5. The Trespass Offering [lamb, goat, turtle dove, pigeon, oil & flour] was a required for the forgiveness of all sins. Dealt specifically with individual sins.

The Jews no longer offer sacrifices. The Temple was destroyed by Rome in 70 AD and they were dispersed throughout the nations. About 600 years later the Muslims built the Dome of the Rock on the location where they thought the Temple existed. There is talk of rebuilding a Temple, but since the Dome of the Rock currently occupies the Temple Mount it won’t come without great tension.

For the Christian, Jesus Christ was the fulfillment of the Trespass Offering and His death paid for their salvation (Tweet That!). His life and death has done away with the need for the whole sacrificial system. Jesus was a descendant of Issac, not Ishmael. We have all we need in the person of Christ. Isaiah says, “He was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth; he was led like a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before its shearers is silent, so he did not open his mouth.” As a Christian I can be assured that when I pass from this world into the next that I will rest in His kingdom. My salvation is not based upon works, but it is out of my love for Him that I do good works. I don’t have to worry about whether or not God will forgive me, His word tells me that I am.

There is no other way, but Jesus.

2 Tim 1:12 “because I know whom I have believed, and am convinced that he is able to guard what I have entrusted to him until that day.”

Sharia – Coming to a town near you?

sharia“Sharia” is a buzzword seen on many social media and news sites these days. What is it? Is Sharia really as bad as people claim and will it come to America? (Tweet That!) Some are claiming it is a torturous and archaic way of keeping the rule of law. Yet others claim that Sharia law is just a set of guidelines upon which actual laws can be based, and as with any law, there is no simple black and white interpretation.

In its simplest definition, Sharia refers to traditional Islamic law. It is based on four governing sources, with the Quran at its base. Muslims believe that the Quran has existed for all time and was revealed to the prophet Mohammed by the Archangel Gabriel in the Arabic language. It is the foundation of the Muslim faith and at the base of the Sharia.

The Sunna is the layer directly above the Quran and is basically the actions and sayings of the Muslim prophet Mohammad. The Sunna is found within a collection of writings known as the Hadith and were written by those close to Mohammad. If answers to an issue cannot be gleaned directly from the Quran then the Hadith should be searched for a resolution. The two main sects of Islam (Sunni and Shia) disagree considerably about which Hadiths are authentic. Each sect has sources they view as trustworthy and those they hold as false, and therefore have differing Sharia systems.

In addition to the Quran and Sunna, the ijam is a third accepted source for the Muslim rule of law. The ijma is the consensus of the Muslim jurists on a particular legal issue. Mohammad himself said, “My followers will never agree upon an error or what is wrong.” If an issue cannot be resolved by the first two sources, then the ijam is to be used.

The Qiyas makes up the fourth critical part of the Sharia. When a legal ruling cannot be found within the first three, then Islamic jurists can employ analogy, reasoning, and legal precedent to arrive at new case law. This is mainly employed by the Sunni followers, but the Shia use a similar form of reasoning.

The specific example of theft can be followed through these various levels. The Quran 5:8 says, “As to the thief, Male or female, cut off his or her hands: a punishment by way of example, from Allah, for their crime: and Allah is Exalted in power.” We also see this example in the life of Mohammad in the Hadith: Bukhari 81:780, “The Prophet said, ‘The hand should be cut off for stealing something that is worth a quarter of a Dinar or more.’” There is also consensus among many schools of thought in Islam about the removing of the hand for theft. The Hanbali school of the Sunnis adds further requirements for this punishment: The property must be of value. It must be in a stored place like a cupboard. It needs two witnesses or two confessions by an individual and the person whom the item was taken must ask for it back.

ebb22702b870db4089387e54def1d560A quick image-search on the term Sharia will return highly negative images, but is Sharia really that bad? You’ll see people holding signs saying, “Democracy is Falling … Sharia is returning.” And “Sharia will dominate the world.” You’ll also see images of people getting their hands cut off, women being buried up to their chest and being stoned, people being beat bloody with whips and individuals having their heads chopped from their bodies.

There are a number of countries that have classical Sharia as their legal system with punishments as listed above— Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, Egypt, Mauritania, Sudan, Iraq, the Maldives, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and certain regions in Malaysia, Indonesia, Nigeria, and the United Arab Emirates. There are many countries that employ a mixed system, where Sharia covers family law, but secular courts handle criminal law.

Homosexuality-Illegal-mapThere are several countries where homosexual behavior can lead to the death penalty (Tweet That!) and prison time. Newsweek reports that about 100 people each year are beheaded in Saudi Arabia for various crimes. As mentioned above, individuals can have their hands and feet amputated for the crime of theft. These examples are harsh, but in normal society they do not happen as often as depicted on the web and in many cases the Sharia does leave room for repentance. To be fair, most often the atrocities we see on news cycles and in our Facebook feeds are performed by extremist groups, but there is still provision for them in many Sharia run governments.

There has been much discussion about Sharia coming to America. There are currently a dozen states that have laws banning Sharia (Tweet That!). The remaining states are split, half of which have rejected legislation that would ban Sharia and half that have no legislation at all. Sharia courts might one day make it to America, but in all truth, Sharia law exists now in the hearts of most Muslims. For the Muslim, submitting to the Sharia is a part of following Allah.

PF_15.04.02_ProjectionsOverview_populationChange_310pxIslam is the fastest growing religion and is growing twice as fast as the general population. It is projected to outnumber Christianity by 2070. If we take a look at the example of the UK we see that the number of registered mosques in 1960 were about seven. The latest number show about 1,500 mosques, and Islam is now the second largest belief system in that nation. It’s difficult to get an exact number, but there are currently about 80 Sharia courts in the UK. These courts really have no power except in moderation of personal disputes, and only when the parties agree to this arbitration, but they do rule on family and religious issues.

As a Christian this info might be a bit disheartening, but it should not be unexpected. 2 Thes. 2, when speaking of the Second Coming says, “Let no one in any way deceive you, for it will not come unless the apostasy comes first.” Jesus also said that, “because of iniquity, the love of many would grow cold.” These facts should drive and compel you. Not in anger or fear, but in love as you share your faith with the Muslim.

I’ve felt driven over the past few months to research and write about the topic of Christianity, Islam and Judaism. My motivation is not one of anger but to inform. The Bible speaks of a time of testing that the entire world must face. The prophecies of this great book cannot be changed, but that should not prevent us from demonstrating the love of Christ. You can disagree with others about issues of faith and still care deeply for them, show love to them and work alongside them. Always treat others with kindness and respect. Period. As a Christian it is our job to share the truth of the Gospel with the Muslim.

21 Day Bible Reading Challenge

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Every year about this time I challenge those in my circle of friends to 21 days of Bible reading.  I don’t always pick the same chapters, but pray about what meaningful scriptures I’d like to add to the list. I want to encourage you to take the challenge. Read God’s Word. See if it changes your life.

  • Day 1 Genesis 1 – The beginning of all things.
  • Day 2 Daniel 3 – A story about God’s protection in tough times.
  • Day 3 Psalms 149 – A little Praise to God.
  • Day 4 Hebrews 11 – The faith chapter.
  • Day 5 Romans 11 – God still has plans for Israel.
  • Day 6 Luke 21 – A little about the end of times.
  • Day 7 Matthew 5 – Sermon on the mount pt #1.
  • Day 8 Matthew 6 – Sermon on the mount pt #2.
  • Day 9 Matthew 7 – Sermon on the mount pt #3.
  • Day 10 John 21 – Some of Jesus’ last concerns.
  • Day 11 Acts 2 – A bit about Pentecost
  • Day 12 1 Corinthians 12 – A bit about spiritual gifts.
  • Day 13 1 Corinthians 13 – The love chapter.
  • Day 14 1 Corinthians 14 – Instructions about spiritual gifts.
  • Day 15 Romans 6 – Being dead to sin.
  • Day 16 Zechariah 14 – God fights for Israel.
  • Day 17 Proverbs 11 – Contrast between upright and wicked.
  • Day 18 Daniel 7 – A bit of prophecy about the last days.
  • Day 19 Isaiah 53 – Prophecy made about Jesus.
  • Day 20 Galatians 5 – Walking in the spirit.
  • Day 21 Revelation 22 – The endings of all things.