21 Day Bible Reading Challenge

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Every year about this time I challenge those in my circle of friends to 21 days of Bible reading.  I don’t always pick the same chapters, but pray about what meaningful scriptures I’d like to add to the list. I want to encourage you to take the challenge. Read God’s Word. See if it changes your life.

  • Day 1 Genesis 1 – The beginning of all things.
  • Day 2 Daniel 3 – A story about God’s protection in tough times.
  • Day 3 Psalms 149 – A little Praise to God.
  • Day 4 Hebrews 11 – The faith chapter.
  • Day 5 Romans 11 – God still has plans for Israel.
  • Day 6 Luke 21 – A little about the end of times.
  • Day 7 Matthew 5 – Sermon on the mount pt #1.
  • Day 8 Matthew 6 – Sermon on the mount pt #2.
  • Day 9 Matthew 7 – Sermon on the mount pt #3.
  • Day 10 John 21 – Some of Jesus’ last concerns.
  • Day 11 Acts 2 – A bit about Pentecost
  • Day 12 1 Corinthians 12 – A bit about spiritual gifts.
  • Day 13 1 Corinthians 13 – The love chapter.
  • Day 14 1 Corinthians 14 – Instructions about spiritual gifts.
  • Day 15 Romans 6 – Being dead to sin.
  • Day 16 Zechariah 14 – God fights for Israel.
  • Day 17 Proverbs 11 – Contrast between upright and wicked.
  • Day 18 Daniel 7 – A bit of prophecy about the last days.
  • Day 19 Isaiah 53 – Prophecy made about Jesus.
  • Day 20 Galatians 5 – Walking in the spirit.
  • Day 21 Revelation 22 – The endings of all things.

What’s Love got to do with it?

The word 'Leadereship' highlighted in green with felt tip pen

Leadership is one of those topics that has been hashed and rehashed millions of times. There are a number of leadership styles ranging from the autocratic lone-ranger, to the democratic let’s take a vote, to the laissez-faire stand back and watch leaders. Beyond styles there are also a number of models that have  changed over the years. Leadership is a very complex topic with no “one” right way. Each model and style has strengths and weakness and we often work most effectively in the model and style that fits our personality. I do however want to mention one aspect that is often missing from the business model of leadership–and that’s love.

Now maybe you’re like Tina Turner and ask, “What’s love got to do with it?” When it comes to the business world, making money is what’s important. It’s the shareholder that matters. It’s getting the job done on time that’s important and I would say you’re absolutely right, but what’s the best means to that end. If we’re going to prosper and win, then why not do it in the biggest possible way. I would like to suggest to you that it’s possible to be financially profitable while enhancing the lives of others (Tweet That!) by using the vehicle of love. Below I’d like to list three benefits, beyond the mighty dollar, when we mix in a little of the underestimated emotion.

Firstly, I’d like to say that genuinely caring for those we lead is a great motivator (Tweet That!). One of the main roles of a leader is to provide proper motivation to those they are leading. I think caring for your team can be one of the greatest motivators that exist. Motivation is different for everyone. Some like a challenge, some like opportunity to move up, and then there’s always money.  But caring is free and it’s benefits go beyond any project or task.

We’ve all heard the quote, “They won’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”  The same is true for influence. As an employee I would go out of my way for a leader that I know cares for me and happily do what they ask. I would still obey an callous leader, but that obedience would come out of a respect for the role and not the person.  When working under a leader who could care less, it’s easy to do just what’s required. The former provides a greater framework for individual productivity.

Thirdly, creating a team atmosphere of caring among group members increases efficiency within the team. When people are happy their output is greater. If the individual will benefit from a caring attitude, then we can expect a greater synergy among the group. Can you imagine a team that is committed to one another? I’ve always believed that by helping others achieve their goals I would ultimately have my own goals fulfilled.

In the end business is business and it’s the bottom line is what drives it. I implore you to aim for a greater bottom line and mix in a little love.

Encryption – Do you need to secure your files?

Security, anonymity​ and privacy are topics you hear a lot about these days. When the news is filled with how terrorists used encryption to mask their evil activities one might ask do we really need it? I would say we absolutely do. It would be easy to make a case for government agencies, banks and even medical services to have access to this type of technology, but I’d even say we as individuals need to use it.​ The Bureau of ​Justice Stastics reported that in 2014​ there were 17.6 million US residents that experienced identity theft.​ On average it costs victims about $1,500 in lost finances and that’s not counting lost hours and stress caused by cleaning up the mess. Most of your personal files don’t need encrypted but you should protect your sensitive data. Things like financial, medical, website passwords, etc should be secure.​​

I’ve spent some time learning the ins and outs of encryption. There’s still much I don’t know, but I do feel I have a good grip on how many of these technologies work.​ I want to use the rest of this article to explain a little about encryption an application I’ve created called Xcipher and how it works.

The two main types of encryption are public and private key. Public key is what we often use when we connect to a secure website. It uses very large prime numbers to create a key that is used to encrypt data in a file. Primes are significant because they take a very long time to factor.​ For example​​ I can take two large prime numbers and multiply them together in seconds, but if I take the result and try to find the two numbers that created it, that would take a long time and for very large primes it could take thousands of years to crack.

Xcipher uses private key encryption which doesn’t use prime numbers at all. Private key encryption is similar to writing your password or padlock combination on a sheet of paper and storing it away till later. The file cannot be unencrypted without the password and it’s kept secret from others.

The Xcipher application will read a byte from the input file create an encrypted byte based upon a character in the password, and then write that byte to the output file….and continue through the entire file.

A byte is 8 bits, and the first read of the file would contain data like this: {01101001 010010101 10100001}.​​ ​After the data is read​ a “mask” of the same length (8 bits) must be created. This mask is basically a random number from 0 – 255. It is used to flip the bits using an Xor operator. Java has a function that returns a random number.  Something really helpful about this function and what makes this application possible is the fact that you can seed the random function with a starting point and it will then return a sequence of numbers that are always the same. If I create a million random numbers the second run with the same seed will create the exact same million numbers.

Let’s say our password is “apple”. It has already read in byte: 01101001 and the first character of the password is a lower case ‘a’. If you use its integer value you get the number 97. We then generate 97 random numbers, toss them to the side, and then use the 98th, which will be an integer between 0 and 255, and that will be our mask. We throw the first numbers away to add complexity to the algorithm making it near impossible to calculate the mask that is returned. If you dont’ have the password that is used to create the mask and the starting point (seed) for the random number you cannot determine the mask. Without it you cannot recreate the original byte.

There are 256 possible number between 0 – 255, and that is important because that is also the largest number possible with a byte. The binary number 11111111 is equal to the decimal number 255. So the random number that is chosen is always the size of one byte….our mask is a random number the size of a byte.

Now lets say the 98th number was 133 which is the binary number 10000101. So now we have:
01101001 – original byte
10000101 – mask 
The Exclusive Or (know as an Xor operator) will compare the two bytes bit for bit.  You remember those truth tables you learned in college, well here’s the one for Xor:

  • 1 Xor 1 = 0
  • 1 Xor 0 = 1
  • 0 Xor 1 = 1
  • 0 Xor 0 = 0.

Let’s do the calculation:
01101001 – original byte
10000101 – mask
____________________________XOR
11101100 – encrypted byte

Xcipher screen shot:

enc2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So how does the decryption work? Well, when you run the encrypted file back through the same program, it will read in the encrypted byte, and when Xor’d with the same mask, it will produce the original byte. So the Xor acts like a switch that will flip the bits back to the original, and java will produce the exact random numbers each time.

Just because bad people use a good technology doesn’t make that technology bad. Encryption is a powerful tool that makes our online communication safe and secure and we should not fear it. If you’re interested in the application just message me and I’ll give you a copy.